When in Nova Scotia, Surf with Happy Dudes in Three Fathom Harbour and Lawrencetown!


 
 
 
 
 
 
The ocean is for everyone to enjoy in a safe and respectful manner. The last few years have seen a large influx in the surfing scene in Nova Scotia.  So, let's all follow a few simple rules to make each surfing experience filled with good memories and tales of surf for years to come.

1) Please drive slowly and carefully through inhabited areas and towns. Many coastal towns have small children who play in or near the streets and roads.

2) Respect the environment, do not litter and use the portable johns and full facilities available at many nearby beaches.

3) Respect the locals and the other surfers around you and learn the Surferís Code of Ethics (see below).

4) If you are a longboarder or a kayaker respect the short boarders and body boarders who are trying to catch waves further down in the break zone: let them catch more than "a few" waves.

5) When changing, use a towel.  Remember . . . no one is proud of "shrinkage".

6) If you're a beginner, stay away from crowds or point breaks.  It's best to learn in the beach breaks.

 

 

 



 





 When the surf
 is up,  find the
 Rental Van on
 the head bank
  overlooking
    Lawrencetown Beach....

    For rentals of boards, gear
 and surf instruction.
 
/more











   
 Have you ever wondered
     what it feels like to walk on
     water?

    
Wonder no more,
     just learn to surf.
   
                                  
/more

 

Help make our breaks safer: inform your fellow surfers of the Surferís Code of Ethics,
many of them donít know these simple rules:
 

Surfer A is up and surfing a wave, Surfer B is paddling to take-off. Surfer A has right of way. Surfer B must get out of the way of Surfer A. If B does catch the wave he/she is "dropping-in" on Surfer A. NEVER DROP IN and ALWAYS LOOK OVER YOUR SHOULDER!
Surfer A and B are both paddling for the same wave and both are relatively close to the peak. However, Surfer A is nearer the peak and therefore has the right of way. Surfer A has right of way. Surfer B MUST stop paddling, get out of the way and give way to Surfer A.
Surfer A is riding a wave, Surfer B is attempting to take off between Surfer A and the peak. By virtue of having established right of way in the take-off zone, Surfer A has the right of way. Surfer B is not entitled to catch the wave and should wait for the next wave.
An unridden wave has just been caught by Surfer A, Surfer B is taking off in a more ideal, closer to the peak, position. Unless surfer A has been riding for "a while" (see example above), Surfer B has right of way.
Surfer A and B have both caught the same wave, surfer A is on the shoulder close to the peak Surfer B is in the broken, whitewater, section of a wave. Surfer A has the right of way. Surfer B should KOOK OUT (go straight towards the "beach" riding the whitewater).
Surfer A is riding on the shoulder when the whitewater mometarily "catches up to him" (or he/she gets tubed), Surfer B is paddling for the wave. Surfer A has the right of way. Surfer B must not takeoff. Since there is a chance that Surfer B did not see Surfer A, Surfer A must let Surfer B know he's coming.
Surfer B was riding the wave when is progress was halted, Surfer A is in position to take-off. Surfer A is entitled to takeoff.
Surfer A and Surfer B are paddling for take-off, Surfer B is attempting to get closer to the peak by paddling in front of (or around) Surfer A. Surfer A has right of way. Surfer B is snaking, DO NOT SNAKE!
Surfer A and Surfer B are both attempting to take-off in a situation where there is a rideable left and right shoulder. Surfer A has right of way on the right hand shoulder while surfer B has right of way on the left hand shoulder. Call out, "left" or "right" as appropriate. Communicate.
Surfer A and Surfer B are both attempting to take-off in a situation where there is a rideable left and right shoulder, but Surfer B is attempting to cross-under the peak. Surfer B is not entitled to cross under the peak to the shoulder already occupied by Surfer A.
Surfer A is entitled to cross under the the peak to the unoccupied right-hander shoulder. In doing so the left-hander shoulder will become available for other surfers to catch.
Surfer A and Surfer B are both riding in a wave that is closing out. Both surfers are entitled to takeoff and ride the unbroken wave section and neither has right of way. Both must pull off the wave before a collision occurs. Use common sense.
Surfer A is riding the wave Surfer B who is either stationary or paddling out. Surfer A has priority but must try to avoid Surfer B. Surfer B must try to paddle away so as not to interfere with A.
Surfer B has thrown the board to duck dive. NEVER THROW YOUR BOARD. It is a danger to you and others. Note: For the same reason do not "kick-out" of a wave when close to other surfers.
Surfer B is paddling out. When paddling out: use any rips or channels and paddle around surfable sections. DO NOT paddle out through the lineup or the rideable sections of the break.
Surfer B has been "caught inside". When caught inside stay in the white water and go around the rideable sections of the break to get back out.

If anyone around you is violating these rules inform them directly, immediately and politely (dip).

This code was developed by the Surfrider Foundation and modified by Happy Dudes.

Print this out and distribute it freely to as many people as you can.
About | Boards | Suits | Lessons | Shop | Marine | Etiquette | Contact | Home


(C) 2005 Happy Dudes Surf Emporium ~ Website Design Services by OceanWeb Technologies